CLASS 006 - MOUNTING MOTORS

Materials:
1 Brushless Motor
1 Motor holder plate
1 Propeller
1 Propeller Shaft
1 Block of Delrin
 

Assembling the motor with holder plate,  propeller and shaft.

Assembling the motor with holder plate,  propeller and shaft.

Used the band saw to cut the Delrin block into a smaller piece, the Delrin was meant for the two materials class to make a flower holder, so I saved some for later. Now I'm preparing to drill holes to hold down the motor.

Used the band saw to cut the Delrin block into a smaller piece, the Delrin was meant for the two materials class to make a flower holder, so I saved some for later.
Now I'm preparing to drill holes to hold down the motor.

Clamped down the Delrin and started to drill holes. It was hard to reverse out the drill when it got deep into the Delrin. I screwed in the first screw until it got half way deep and got completely stuck in the Delrin, it was then till I realized I used a drill bit that was smaller than the screw.

Clamped down the Delrin and started to drill holes. It was hard to reverse out the drill when it got deep into the Delrin. I screwed in the first screw until it got half way deep and got completely stuck in the Delrin, it was then till I realized I used a drill bit that was smaller than the screw.

I made sure the holes were aligned correctly to the motor plate by drilling through the plate's holes with one hole always screwed down.

I made sure the holes were aligned correctly to the motor plate by drilling through the plate's holes with one hole always screwed down.

After drilling out the position of the holes, I started drilling each holes deep as the screws.

After drilling out the position of the holes, I started drilling each holes deep as the screws.

After mounting the motor, I tested the brushless motor with power. The Delrin is heavy but still not heavy enough to completely hold down the motor without moving. I am now ordering a 1/4'' plywood to hold down the delrin, will fabricate tomorrow.

After mounting the motor, I tested the brushless motor with power. The Delrin is heavy but still not heavy enough to completely hold down the motor without moving. I am now ordering a 1/4'' plywood to hold down the delrin, will fabricate tomorrow.

CLASS 005 - TWO MATERIALS

To continue on the storm globe piece, this week I made the filling of the storm and also the container of it.
I found a mannequin made of styrofoam and dug it into tiny styrofoam balls. And then I bought a type of linen that had small holes so air of the fan could blow through, but the holes are small enough to contain the tiny styrofoam balls at the same time.
To stick the linen to the plastic semi-sphere, according to This To That I should use epoxy glue, but since time was sensitive, I decided to give the hot glue a try.

Using the glue gun was a task, it requires really fast action otherwise the glue would dry up in an instant, even faster then acrylic glue!

This is the end result. The hot glue held it very tight, no matter how I shook the semi-sphere, it still stayed in place.

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CLASS 004 - ENCLOSURE

For the enclosure assignment, I am making a snow globe like piece. 

Laser cut an ellipse out of the acrylic sheet, made sure it was a little bit larger than the actual diameter of the semi-sphere.

Laser cut an ellipse out of the acrylic sheet, made sure it was a little bit larger than the actual diameter of the semi-sphere.

Sketching out the composition and dimensions.  

Sketching out the composition and dimensions.

 

Not that accurate. The height of this enclosure is designed to fit in a cooling fan along with an Arduino, I have cut out small walls for them to sit in, will update photos.

Not that accurate. The height of this enclosure is designed to fit in a cooling fan along with an Arduino, I have cut out small walls for them to sit in, will update photos.

I cut 1/8 inch extra, somehow it could have been smaller, but still fitted alright.

I cut 1/8 inch extra, somehow it could have been smaller, but still fitted alright.

Piecing all the laser cut parts together. For the side parts I used 1/4 thick, 12" x 24'' acrylic sheet, and it took almost 3.5 hours to cut it through on the 50W cutter. 

Piecing all the laser cut parts together. For the side parts I used 1/4 thick, 12" x 24'' acrylic sheet, and it took almost 3.5 hours to cut it through on the 50W cutter. 

I added two long stops for the lid, so it will stay put when covering the bottom part. It was a tricking process to align them right.  

I added two long stops for the lid, so it will stay put when covering the bottom part. It was a tricking process to align them right.
 

For the next assignment, I will continue to design the snow globe, adding on copper mesh and rubber tube.

CLASS 003 - LASER

This week, playing with acrylic, the laser cutter, and the acrylic heater. 

After seeing the beautiful examples of bended acrylic in class, I wanted to test out the acrylic heater myself. The idea I had in mind was to bend the acrylic and form it as a piece of folded fabric.

 

Before playing with the heater, I made 20 more business cards with the laser cutter, the final results can be found here. This time I etched the letters 6 times, to achieve a deeper carved feeling. At one point, maybe because I left the back sticker on, the laser caught on fire and burnt the surface of the acrylic a bit.

 

Before bending the actual acrylic, I prototyped with paper, thinking about the angles and pressure points. I was pretty confident that this would be an easy project.

Yet, of course, it's always more complicated than it seemed. It wasn't difficult to bend the acrylic, but the timing had to be supervised carefully. My first test failed because I left the sheet on the theater for way too long, and the final bend part was overheated which had all these tiny bubbles. The sides were also too straight which didn't appear to be soft like fabric. 

IMG_1728.JPG

The second test, before folding the sheet, I started with heating up all different parts of the sheet and bending them to mimic fabric wrinkles. 

CLASS 002 - FIVE THINGS

This week our task is to make 5 of the same object. I decided to make some stools for the house. As we only have one chair, when friends come over, everyone just sits on the floor. It's about time to progress our butts to another wooden surface.

Inspired by Donald Judd, the stool I had in mind is something simple that could also function as a shelving unit. 

SKETCH ONE

SKETCH ONE

SKETCH TWO

SKETCH TWO

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I prototyped a cardboard version (when I had the plexi glass sheet in mind still) before buying the wood to see the proportions. At first I wanted to combine plywood with a slide of plexi glass, but after consideration of time and my zero experience with cutting wood, I toned it down a bit. After confirming all the sheet size and how to arrange them,  I ordered the pre-cut plywood from midtown lumber with the exact dimensions.

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My main job for this project is to drill holes for dowel pins and connect the pieces together. At first I thought this was going to be easy and quick, since I have the magic tool - Dowel pin jig from Ben. But but but, of course it was exactly the opposite. While making the first pancake, I drilled too deep in the wood that it drilled through. I also had two other major problems to solve:
1 how to make the holes on different wood sheets to perfectly align with each other in a fast way, I had 80 holes to drill! ( the holes need to be perfectly aligned with holes from another sheet, as I will need to assemble them together with a dowel pin)
2 how to drill a hole that is exactly deep as half of the dowel pin. ( which only did I find out I could use a drill stopper on the driver, after I have finished all five of the stools! )
3 how not to drill the hole at the wrong position, as all the wood sheets look the same

 

 

CLASS 001 - FLASHLIGHT

I am super excited to start fabrication class as I've always wanted to design and make things, but never really had the time and resource (and also just lazy) to actualize this fantasy. When I heard that our first assignment was making a flash light, I had an immediate reaction that I wanted to design a sort of light sculpture, a design that sculpts light instead of being a point light.

I started out with the idea to etch led lights bulbs into a thick sheet of acrylic, but after testing that out (see pictures below), the light was not diffused enough, so I moved on to the next idea.

 
 

I have this thick transparent acrylic block as a paperweight at home, I thought maybe it could be useful to sculpt the light from one end to the other. So I started sketching different settings. 

sketch 001

sketch 001

sketch 002

sketch 002

final sketch

final sketch

After confirming the final sketch, I started making the object.
It will be consisted of one thin sheet of translucent acrylic on top of a thick transparent acrylic block, and at the bottom there will be a battery box also functioning as the block holder.

What I had to do is cut the acrylic block into preferred size with saw and sand it. Also laser cut the thin layer on top and the battery box/holder.

The most tricky part was to figure out the switch. At first I wanted to just be lazy and not make a switch at all, the light will just be controlled by putting the battery in the battery holder, which I had soldered the wires together. But then I thought I should definitely push harder to make it work like a wholesome design. And I'm glad I did, with the help of some super amazing people on the floor. I made a switch that uses the weight of the transparent thick block to turn on the light.

This is what came out in the end.
:) 
 

The light itself is relatively bright, but somehow does not quite show in the photos.

The light itself is relatively bright, but somehow does not quite show in the photos.