#I LOVE WHAT YOU'RE WEARING

7 weeks has passed by, too fugitive almost, but all the thoughts, rebellions, manifestos within are pyramids to climb and explore. I started it out by having the desire to research on the documentation, the exercise, the perception of contemporary time, or maybe futuristic time. continuing the investigation of On Kawara's. Yet, I feel not ready to execute and practice on this subject as the final of this class, not just because I am an addicted procrastinator (while researching on this topic, I came upon this funny reading : Procrastination Through the Ages: A Brief History of Wasting Time ).

So I decided, to take on another subject, a world I was once very familiar and deep in, the industry of imaginary, imagery, dangerous, beautiful, ugly, vicious, public mass illusionary, ... so on, the industry of advertising and fashion. How and why is it, that clothes one wears today, seems to be almost or even more significant(to some people) then who the person really is, or was it ever this way all along. How is that I walk down the streets in Manhattan and Brooklyn, I can't escape posters, billboards, windows and spaces selling nothing but clothing, but nothing really. What has these clothes done to us? And what have we done to them? What are these brands of fashion telling us? And what are they telling about us?

Remixing my words with John Berger and Mark Grief, my concern is present.
We are so accustomed to being addressed by these images, on screens, in the streets, in the magazine, on TV, on billboards, on Taxi cabs, on Instagram, we are so accustomed that we scarcely notice their total impact. We have accepted the total system of fashion imagery as we accept an element of climate. Women portrayed no fundamentally different from women portrayed centuries ago, her body is arranged to display, with subtle hints or explicit manifestos of simulated sexuality from a Barbie.  

How does a system convince people that they do not possess their "image" and sex properly? Teach them that in their possession it is shapeless and unconditioned. Only once it has been modified, layered with experts, honeycombed with norms, overlaid with pictorial representations and sold back to them, can it fulfill itself as what its possessors "always wanted". Breasts starved away by dieting will be reacquired in breast-implant surgery - to attain the original free good, once destroyed, now re-created unnaturally. 

 
the evolution of a logo

the evolution of a logo

calvin klein on broadway

calvin klein on broadway

the new "cool" kids on internet

the new "cool" kids on internet

interview by one of the most successful online fashion retail shop/magazine with Leo Mandella on the topic Logomania

interview by one of the most successful online fashion retail shop/magazine with Leo Mandella on the topic Logomania

where the clothes are made

where the clothes are made

where they end up to be

where they end up to be

will update more on the concept, reasoning and thinking behind this project.
now i'm on molding the silicone t-shirt.

 

 

The project is called I LOVE WHAT YOU'RE WEARING
This project will be consisted of a few parts:
for the class final i'll be finishing 1,2,3,4


1 cutting off all labels from the clothes I own
2 stitching them together

3 mold a 0 size t-shirt out of silicone
4 stitch all labels to the silicone t-shirt

5 videos/images of the design process of the labels
6 videos/images of the factories manufacturing the clothes
7 videos/images of the advertisement/fashion shows/campaigns of the labels
8 screenshots/recordings of the comments/selfie tags on Instagram of the labels by consumers

 
03.14 : this is my first try on molding the silicone, not completely satisfied with the result. going to try a different method of molding it.

03.14 : this is my first try on molding the silicone, not completely satisfied with the result. going to try a different method of molding it.

making the mold out of plaster

making the mold out of plaster

curing silicone

curing silicone

silicone t-shirt

silicone t-shirt

arranging labels

arranging labels

decided this is not a good way to present, want to deconstruct the labels rather than perfectly alining them. 

decided this is not a good way to present, want to deconstruct the labels rather than perfectly alining them. 

stiched all the "made in" labels together

stiched all the "made in" labels together

threw them together randomly. seems better than the previous arrangement. going to shred the labels in the paper shredder tomorrow and then re-assemble again.

threw them together randomly. seems better than the previous arrangement.
going to shred the labels in the paper shredder tomorrow and then re-assemble again.

 

 

 

 



Reference Materials:
Simulation and Simulacra - Jean Bauldrillard
Ways of Seeing - John Berger
Against Everything - Mark Greif (essay Against Exercise, essay Afternoon of the Sex Children, essay The Reality of Reality Television)
What's Wrong with the Fashion Industry - Vestoj - link

CLASS 003

Fluxus was a loose confederation of international artists in the 1960s working in performance, painting, sculpture, poetry, experimental music, and even correspondence art (art sent through the postal service). It was often, though not exclusively, political in tone. Fluxus works shared similarities with the “Happenings” of Allan Kaprow, particularly in the way they blurred distinctions between art and life. In doing so, Fluxus transformed art from an object of aesthetic contemplation to a gesture of political action. The actions of these artists laid the groundwork for Conceptual art and performance art in the decades to come, and Fluxus shared members with other movements, such as Neo-Dada and video art.

a flow of fluids and discharge—were interrupted by his handwritten political statements calling for a fusion between art and reality. 

 “… the nature of my sculpture is not fixed or finished … Everything is in a state of change.” Joseph Beuys

The research program of the Fluxus laboratory is characterized by twelve ideas:

globalism,
the unity of art and life,
intermedia,
experimentalism,
chance,
playfulness,
simplicity,
implicativeness,
exemplativism,
specificity,
presence in time, and
musicality.

While it might be an overstatement to say that the Fluxus movement revolutionized the art world or the real world in the ways that Maciunas called for in his manifesto, it did help to radically change notions of what art could be. With their work, the Fluxus artists pushed art well outside of mainstream venues like galleries and museums. Their informal, spontaneous, and often ephemeral pieces were not only difficult to collect and codify; they were also sometimes hard to recognize as art. But museums and galleries eventually caught up and absorbed their work. So too did younger generations of artists, who continue to build on the freedom that the movement introduced into artmaking with their own work. The next time you walk into an art space and find a pot of curry bubbling on a burner (as in the well-known piece, Untitled (Free), 1992, by the Thai artist Rirkrit Tiravanija) or a sculpture composed of things you might find in your own home, thank Fluxus for helping to lay the groundwork.

La Monte Young

La Monte Young

Henry Flynt

Henry Flynt

CLASS 002

On Kawara _
The “Today” series, part of the Duchampian tradition of making art directly from dumb reality, treated each date as a ready-made. The works seemed straightforward — even obvious — and maddeningly repetitive, suggesting the Zen passivity of John Cage’s acceptance of noise as music. But they were also diaristic and meditative and could resonate with existential, psychological and scientific implications about the time-space continuum.

 

 

 

Past: all years from 998.031 B.C. until 1969.
Future: all years from 1969 until 1.001.995 A.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Screen is average of 12cm vertical
  2. Physical pixels 1136px (every cm is 95 pixels vertical)
  3. Amount of time spent scrolling 4 hours (240 min)

    If we assume that for every 5 seconds of phone usage, the person scrolls 20 cm on average (which is the speed I'd estimate someone scrolling through Facebook or skimming a web page would have, if you measure the distance the screen scrolls, which is more than the distance the person swipes their finger across it)

     (240*60 sec/day * 20/5 cm/sec = 14400sec * 4cm = 57600cm ---5,472,000 pixel)

  4. Track Scrolling

  5. Transfer into pixels

  6. Document into lines with data or for every pixel I scroll print SCROLL

CLASS 001

The central component of chance is taking one thing out of context and placing it into another context, demonstrating how meaning is fixed to a site and how meaning is unfixed when location is changed.

Acrobats c. 1927

Acrobats
c. 1927

Small Feathers 1931

Small Feathers
1931

excerpts from research readings:

Calder's early artworks were nurtured by many sources: Marcel Duchamp, who suggested the name "mobile" for the kinetic art form that Calder so famously employed; Piet Mondrian, who introduced Calder to pure abstraction; and Joan Miró, who introduced Calder to Surrealism.

Calder’s kinetic sculptures are regarded as being amongst the earliest manifestations of an art that consciously departed from the traditional notion of the art work as a static object and integrated the ideas of gesture and immateriality as aesthetic factors.

The larger myth of the mobile is that it represents the triumph of kinetic sculpture, when in reality the mobile was as different as one could imagine from the original vision: passive rather than active; not at all mechanical; and random rather than directed in its motion. Indeed, the mobile drew upon none of the incredible technical resources of the twentieth century, the appropriation of which had of course been the principal inspiration of the original kineticists.

It cannot be claimed that Calder was pursuing any radically new, original course in sculpture at this time. Open-form sculpture was under constant discussion during these years; with the collaboration of Gonzalez, Picasso was also working with wire. But, whereas he was soldering and using wire as a stiff, sticklike element, Calder, who has always preferred mechanical construc tions, was creating in the manner that has remained characteristic for him. He has always found it easier to think with his hands, to think in terms of specific mate rials. He bends and twists wire to outline planes and volume and follow features as if wire were a fluid line drawn in space. The flexibility of these wire figures shows that from the first Calder displayed a propensity for mov ing form. 

In 1920 Naum Gabo had written the Realistic Manifesto in which he announced the Constructivist break with the plastic tradition that had dominated Western art for "1000 years." Among his pronouncements are several that seem appropriate to Calder: "The realization of our perceptions of the world in the forms of space and time is the only aim of our pic torial and plastic art.... we construct our work as the universe constructs its own, as the engineer constructs his bridges, as the mathematician his formula of the orbits.... everything has its own essential image — all [are] entire worlds with their own rhythms, their own orbits." 

 

A UNIVERSE. (1934) "The orbits are all circular arcs or circles. The supports have been painted to disappear against a white background to leave nothing but the moving elements, their forms and colors, and their orbits, speeds and accelerations The aesthetic value of these objects cannot be arrived at by reasoning. Familiarization is necessary." (Statement, 1934)

 

Calder's work has been widely accepted— particularly his kinetic constructions—despite a general resistance to non-objective art. Calder has said, "When you see a thing move you know what it will do," which possibly ac counts for the popularity of his mobiles. But it is also possible that since the movement gives the sculpture a life of its own, one responds to it as one responds to another living thing—directly, bypassing the difficulties of its con tent as a highly sophisticated work of art, taking delight in its humor. The stabiles have also been accepted, al though with difficulty at times, perhaps because the spirit of play is very strong in everything that Calder does, but more probably because their strongly organic presence creates yet another direct, physical experience and response. Fernand Leger once called Calder a realist; Calder's reply is: "If you can't imagine things, you can't make them, and anything you imagine is real."

 

Dreams Money Can Buy is a 1947 anthology film made by artist/author Hans Richter and collaborators like Marcel Duchamp, Fernand Leger, Man Ray, Alexander Calder, Max Ernst and others. There is music from John Cage, Paul Bowles and a number by scandalous bisexual torch singer Libby Holman and popular African-American singer Josh White (who was later caught up in the “Red Scare” and black-listed) on the original soundtrack titled “The Girl with the Pre-Fabricated Heart” that plays during Leger’s segment. 

Richter’s goal was to bring the avant-garde out of the museum and into the movie house and the results, predictably, are rather unique. Certainly Dreams Money Can Buy must have been a stunner at the time and it still is. With no spoken dialogue, the plot, such that there is one, revolves around a man who rents a room where he can peer into the mirror and see people’s dreams. He sets up shop and we meet his clients and see their interior lives in the dream sequences. As you can imagine with the above list of collaborators, the film is a dizzying treat of audio-visual creation.

 

reference links:
1 MOMA - A SALUTE TO ALEXANDER CALDER
2 WIKI